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All posts by Susan du Plessis

27

Apr'17

The Hazards of English Spelling: New Findings Make It Less Hazardous than Previously Thought

A new study of English spelling practices demonstrates that the way we spell words is much more orderly and self-organising than previously thought. Their research examines previously unnoticed systematic aspects of English spelling and explains how the system emerged. One suffix that the authors report on is -ous, found in words like nervous and hazardous...

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27

Apr'17

How To Fit In When You Stand Out: Don’t Try So Hard

When in Rome you do as the Romans do, right? Not necessarily. When it comes to fitting in with foreign cultures, "just be yourself" might be the more appropriate mantra, according to Brigham Young University professor Stephen Moody.

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25

Apr'17

How Walking Benefits the Brain

You probably know that walking does your body good, but it's not just your heart and muscles that benefit. Researchers at New Mexico Highlands University (NMHU) found that the foot's impact during walking sends pressure waves through the arteries that significantly modify and can increase the supply of blood to the brain.

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25

Apr'17

Why Children Struggle to Cross Busy Streets Safely

For adults, crossing the street by foot seems easy. You take stock of the traffic and calculate the time it will take to get from one side to the other without being hit. Yet it's anything but simple for a child. New research from the University of Iowa shows children under certain ages lack the perceptual judgement and motor skills to cross a busy road consistently without putting themselves in danger.

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24

Apr'17

Visuele Diskriminasie: Wat Dit Is en Hoe Om Probleme te Oorkom

Visuele diskriminasie is die vermoë om ooreenkomste en verskille tussen visuele stimuli te onderskei of raak te sien. As ‘n kind oor onvoldoende visuele diskriminasie beskik, sal hy heel waarskynlik die volgende skolastiese simptome openbaar...

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24

Apr'17

Neuroscientists Identify Brain Circuit Necessary for Memory Formation

When we visit a friend or go to the beach, our brain stores a short-term memory of the experience in a part of the brain called the hippocampus. Those memories are later "consolidated" -- that is, transferred to another part of the brain for longer-term storage.

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24

Apr'17

Laterality versus Directionality: What Is the Difference?

Laterality refers to motor awareness of the two sides of the body, while directionality refers to the ability to know right from left, up from down, forwards from backwards, etc. The child who has a laterality problem has not yet internalised the knowledge that the body has two sides...

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19

Apr'17

Hulp vir ADHD en Leesprobleme

Navorsing by die Sweedse mediese universiteit Karolinska Institutet het bewys dat oefening van werkende geheue ('working memory') sigbare veranderinge teweegbring in die aantal dopamien reseptors in die menslike brein. Werkende geheue is kritiek vir onder andere...

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19

Apr'17

Edublox Explained in a Nutshell

Learning is like building a house. The first step is to lay a foundation. Unless there is a strong and solid foundation, cracks will soon appear in the walls, and with no foundation, the walls will collapse. In the same way one needs to lay a proper foundation before it becomes possible for a child to benefit from a course in reading, writing and arithmetic...

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04

Apr'17

Understanding Auditory Processing Deficits

Auditory processing is the ability to identify, interpret, and attach meaning to sound. Berry and Eisenson state that children with auditory processing deficits can hear sounds but are unable to recognise them for meaning. Auditory processing plays as important a role as visual processing in reading.

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