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All posts by Susan du Plessis

14

Jul'17

One in Six Women with Learning Disabilities Has Attempted Suicide

Learning disabilities such as dyslexia cast a very long shadow. A new study by the University of Toronto found that the lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts was much higher for women who had been diagnosed with learning disabilities (16.6%) compared to women who had not (3.3%). Men with learning disabilities also were more likely...

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14

Jul'17

The Brain Mechanism Behind Multitasking

Although "multitasking" is a popular buzzword, research shows that only 2% of the population actually multitasks efficiently. Most of us just shift back and forth between different tasks, a process that requires our brains to refocus time and time again -- and reduces overall productivity by a whopping 40%. New Tel Aviv University research identifies a brain mechanism that enables more efficient multitasking.

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14

Jul'17

Is It Okay for Children to Count on Their Fingers?

Is it OK for children to count on their fingers? Generations of pupils have been discouraged by their teachers from using their hands when learning maths. But a new research article shows using fingers may be a much more important part of maths learning than previously thought.

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13

Jul'17

Link Between Sleep and Alzheimer’s Explained

A study has shown that disrupting just one night of sleep in healthy, middle-aged adults causes an increase in amyloid beta, a brain protein associated with Alzheimer's disease. And a week of tossing and turning leads to an increase in another brain protein, tau, which has been linked to brain damage in Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases.

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14

Jun'17

The Importance of Spelling and Handwriting in a Digital Age

It's a fair question for parents to consider: Why should my child learn to master the skills of spelling and handwriting in a world governed by spell checkers and keyboards? Isn't the mere notion of teaching these skills as archaic as attempting to master trigonometry without the use of a scientific calculator?

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13

Jun'17

SA Laaste in die Wêreld met Wiskunde, Wetenskap en Lees

Ons het nie statistieke van voor 1995 nie, maar sedert 1995 is SA laaste in die wêreld met wiskunde, wetenskap en lees. Daar is twee internasionale geletterdheidstudies wat elke paar jaar gedoen word, en waaraan Suid-Afrika deelneem. Die eerste een is TIMSS, wat elke vier jaar gr. 4- en gr. 8-leerders se syfergeletterdheid, sowel as hulle wetenskaplike vermoëns en kennis evalueer. Die tweede is die PIRLS, wat elke vyf jaar die leesprestasie van gr. 4-leerders meet...

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10

Jun'17

Leer Afrikaans: Verkleinwoorde

In die meeste tale word 'n verkleiningsvorm gevorm deur 'n agtervoegsel en/of 'n ekstra verbuiging van die oorspronklike woord. In Afrikaans word die agtervoegsels -tjie, -jie, -pie, -kie en -ie saam met 'n paar verboë vorms gebruik.

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10

Jun'17

Amazingly Flexible: Learning to Read in Your 30s Profoundly Transforms the Brain

New research shows that when adults learns to read for the first time, the changes that occur in their brain are not limited to the outer layer of the brain, the cortex, but extends to deep brain structures in the thalamus and the brainstem. This was observed in illiterate Indian women who learned how to read and write for six months.

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30

May'17

Leer Afrikaans: Trappe van Vergelyking

Die stellende trap is die gewone vorm van die byvoeglike naamwoord, byvoorbeeld mooi en gewoon. Die vergrotende trap (ook vergelykende trap of die komparatief genoem) word gevorm deur -er agteraan die woord te voeg, of met die word meer, byvoorbeeld, mooier en meer ongewoon.

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29

May'17

Leer Afrikaans: Intensiewe Vorme

Intensiewe vorme is byvoeglike naamwoorde in die versterkende graad en word dus gebruik om 'n byvoeglike naamwoord te versterk. 'n Voorbeeld hiervan is brandarm, wat baie arm beteken. In Afrikaans skryf ons intensiewe vorme altyd vas (as een woord), behalwe by wawyd oop, nugter wakker en blakend gesond....

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