Cognitive Skills and Deficits

29

Oct'16

Understanding Visual Perceptual Skills and Visual Perceptual Deficits

The terms visual perceptual skills and visual processing skills are often used interchangeably, and refer to the skills that a person uses to make sense of what they see. Recognising letters and numbers, matching shapes, recognising a face, finding a toy in a messy cupboard, reading a road sign – these are all examples of how visual perception is used in everyday life.

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28

Oct'16

Sleep-Short Drivers Worse than Drink-Drive Drivers!

Sleep-deprived driving (commonly known as tired driving, drowsy driving, or fatigued driving) is the operation of a motor vehicle while being cognitively impaired by a lack of sleep. Sleep deprivavtion is a major cause of motor vehicle accidents, and it can impair the human brain as much as alcohol can.

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19

Oct'16

Visual Perception and Academic Success

Getman, a renowned behavioural optometrist, defined vision as a learned ability to understand things which cannot be heard, touched, smelled or tasted. He distinguished vision from sight which, according to him, is simply a response to light and from acuity which refers to light's clarity, and stated that vision enables the child to interpret the world.

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17

Oct'16

Men More Prone to Mild Cognitive Impairment

When it comes to remembering things, new research shows men are more likely than women to have mild cognitive impairment, the transition stage before dementia. "This is one of the first studies to determine the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment among men and women who have been randomly selected from a community to participate in the study," said study author Rosebud Roberts, MD,..

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09

Oct'16

Research Study: Visual Memory Improved by 1.3 Years in Five Days

Various researchers have stated that as much as eighty percent of all learning takes place through the eye, with visual memory existing as a crucial aspect of learning. Visual memory involves the ability to store and retrieve previously experienced visual sensations and perceptions when the stimuli that originally evoked them are no longer present.

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09

Oct'16

How the Brain Builds Panoramic Memory

When asked to visualise your childhood home, you can probably picture not only the house you lived in, but also the buildings next door and across the street. MIT neuroscientists have now identified two brain regions that are involved in creating these panoramic memories.

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11

Sep'16

Cognitive Functioning Determines Success on Social, Educational, Economic and Marital Front

Cognitive functions are higher order mental processes that help us gather and process information, and encompass functions such as focused and divided attention, visual and spatial processing, visual and auditory short-term and long-term memory, reasoning, and language and reading skills. Research has demonstrated a link between cognitive functioning and social functioning, educational performance, economic status and commitment to marriage.

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04

Sep'16

Alzheimer’s Disease Is Frequently Misdiagnosed

The symptoms of Alzheimer’s dementia are well described, but a new study shows that the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease isn’t always an accurate one. It’s a condition that can be frequently misdiagnosed.

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13

Aug'16

Why and How We Forget

Forgetting is actually both necessary and useful. Imagine remembering every single second of every single day of your life. It would be very difficult to keep all the information organised and to focus on one thing at a time. There is just too much information to be remembered. We automatically forget most of the sensory information we take in without even realising it.

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02

Mar'16

Memory Techniques Not the Answer to Memory Challenges

“Children, it's almost time to go home. Please write down your homework, put your books away, and line up at the door.” Sounds simple and straight forward… So why is John already lined up at the door when his books are all over his desk? And where are the materials he needs to take home to do his homework?

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