Dyslexia: Symptoms, Causes and Treatment

05

Nov'13

Wider Letter Spacing Helps Dyslexic Children

Increasing the spacing between characters and words in a text improves the speed and quality of dyslexic children's reading, without prior training. They read 20 percent faster on average and make half as many errors.

Read More

08

Jul'13

Dyslexia Symptoms and Signs

While the term is mostly used to describe a severe reading problem, there has been little agreement in the literature or in practice concerning the definition of severe or the specific distinguishing characteristics that differentiate dyslexia from other reading problems.

Read More

02

Mar'12

New Research May Change the Face of Dyslexia

According to popular belief dyslexia is a neurological disorder in the brain which causes information to be processed and interpreted differently, resulting in reading difficulties. However, this notion has recently been challenged by neuroscientist John D. E. Gabrieli...

Read More

13

Oct'09

Dyslexia Varies Across Languages

Chinese-speaking children with dyslexia have a disorder that is distinctly different, and perhaps more complicated and severe, than that of English speakers. Those differences can be seen in the brain and in the performance of Chinese children on visual and oral language tasks...

Read More

27

Apr'07

How the Brains of Taxi Drivers Throw New Light on Dyslexia

The idea of a learning disability is deeply rooted in research studies indicating that the brains of people with learning difficulties, such as dyslexia, are different from the brains of so-called “normal” people. Such neurological differences, supposedly, are the cause of dyslexia or a learning difficulty. More and more research studies, however, suggest that the cause-effect relationship should be reversed...

Read More

21

Jun'05

Studies Show Dyslexia Impairs Driving

Dyslexia can affect one in many areas of your life, and driving a car is one of them. Dyslexia can impair a driver's reactions as much as a moderate drinking session. That is the conclusion of a small study which compared how quickly dyslexic and non-dyslexic drivers react to traffic signs.

Read More

27

Dec'99

Dyslexic Children Use Nearly Five Times the Brain Area

Dyslexic children use nearly five times the brain area as normal children while performing a simple language task, according to a new study by an interdisciplinary team of University of Washington researchers.

Read More
Skip to toolbar