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Learning and Learning Problems

05

Feb'17

Practice Makes Perfect, and ‘Overlearning’ Locks It In

Want to learn something and then quickly make that mastery stick? A new Brown University study in which people learned visual perception tasks suggests that you should keep practising for a little while even after you think you can't get any better. Such "overlearning" locked in performance gains, according to the Nature Neuroscience paper that describes the effect and its underlying neurophysiology.

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02

Feb'17

Kids Should Pay More Attention to Mistakes, Study Suggests

At Edublox learners have always been encouraged not to shy away from their mistakes, in fact they are taught "you may make mistakes, just try your best and then correct your mistakes." Now research suggests teachers and parents should help children pay more attention to the mistakes they make so they can better learn from them, as opposed to shying away from or glossing over mistakes.

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22

Jan'17

Quotes about Learning

The secret of getting ahead is getting started... A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new... Teachers open the door, but you must enter by yourself... Live as if you were to die tomorrow, learn as if you were to live forever....

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19

Jan'17

Child Gets Good Report Yet Cannot Read, Cannot Do Maths

Johnny's teacher is happy about his performance in reading and maths. She awarded him a 6/7 for reading and a 7/7 for maths on his year-end report. Johnny's parents should be proud... The truth is that Johnny's parents are becoming more and more unsettled. If Johnny's reading is considered to be good, why is his younger sister's reading so much better than his?

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15

Jan'17

Our Senses Can’t Learn Under Stress

When we train them, we can sharpen our senses thereby improve our perceptual performance. The stress hormone cortisol completely blocks this important ability. In the current issue of Psychoneuroendocrinology neuroscientists of the Ruhr University Bochum (RUB) report on this finding.

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15

Jan'17

Study Raises Hope that Autism Behaviours May be Reversible

About 1 percent of people with autism are missing a gene called Shank3, which is critical for brain development. Without this gene, individuals develop typical autism symptoms including repetitive behaviour and avoidance of social interactions. In a study of mice, MIT researchers have now shown that they can reverse some of those behavioural symptoms by turning the gene back on later in life...

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10

Jan'17

Brain Impairments in Premature Infants May Begin in the Womb

Even before they are born, premature babies may display alterations in the circuitry of their developing brains, according to a first-of-its kind research study by Yale School of Medicine researchers and their colleagues at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Wayne State University.

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18

Dec'16

What Goes Wrong In the Brain When Someone Can’t Spell

By studying stroke victims who have lost the ability to spell, researchers have pinpointed the parts of the brain that control how we write words. In the journal 'Brain', Johns Hopkins University neuroscientists link basic spelling difficulties for the first time with damage to seemingly unrelated regions of the brain, shedding new light on the mechanics of language and memory.

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22

Nov'16

Help for Handwriting Problems

A handwriting problem exists when a learner writes illegibly or extremely slowly. Everyone occasionally produces some illegible letters, but some learners do so frequently enough that understanding what they have written is difficult; at this point, the difficulty would be considered a problem. Learn more about the causes and how a handwriting problem can be overcome.

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20

Nov'16

Spelling Mnemonics: Helpful But Not a Solution

A mnemonic is a specific reconstruction of target content intended to tie new information more closely to the learner's existing knowledge base and, therefore, facilitate retrieval. Spelling mnemonics is intended to help us remember the spelling of words. In order to remember that the word “cemetery” is spelled with three e's, for example, one can picture a lady screaming 'E-E-E' as she walks past the cemetery...

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