fbpx

Learning a Second Language

29

Aug'19

Research: What’s the Best Way to Teach Children a Second Language?

People often assume that children learn new languages easily and without effort, regardless of the situation they find themselves in. But is it really true that children soak up language like sponges?

Read More

29

Apr'17

Bilingual Baby Brains Show Increased Activity in Executive Function Regions

Many brain studies show that bilingual adults have more activity in areas associated with executive function, a set of mental abilities that includes problem-solving, shifting attention and other desirable cognitive traits. Now new findings reveal that this bilingualism-related difference in brain activity is evident as early as 11 months of age...

Read More

20

Mar'17

Late Bilinguals Are Sensitive to Unique Aspects of Second Language, Research Shows

Imagine coming across a sentence in English that reads like this: "Mary apple eats her delicious." For most native-English speakers, the sentence would likely strike you as odd because it doesn't seem to be structured in an order that immediately gets the message across...

Read More

30

Oct'16

EEG Recordings Prove Learning Foreign Languages Can Sharpen Our Minds

Scientists from the Higher School of Economics (HSE) together with colleagues from the University of Helsinki have discovered that learning foreign languages enhances the brain's elasticity and its ability to code information. The more foreign languages we learn, the more effectively our brain reacts and processes the data accumulated in the course of learning.

Read More

29

Aug'15

Tips on Learning a Second Language

Learning a second language is a good thing, as it improves brainpower. Learning a new language alters grey matter the same way exercise builds muscles. However, learning a second language can be really challenging and an obstacle in the road to success.

Read More

31

Jan'08

New Language Boosts Brainpower

Learning a second language can improve brainpower, a study says. Researchers at University College London studied the brains of 105 people, 80 of whom were bilingual, and found that learning a new language altered grey matter the same way exercise builds muscles...

Read More
Skip to toolbar