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Neuroplasticity

23

Mar'17

Brain ‘Rewires’ Itself to Enhance other Senses in Blind People

The brains of those who are born blind make new connections in the absence of visual information, resulting in enhanced, compensatory abilities such as a heightened sense of hearing, smell and touch, as well as cognitive functions (such as memory and language) according to a new study led by Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers...

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24

Feb'17

Astronauts’ Brains Change Shape During Spaceflight

MRIs before and after space missions reveal that astronauts' brains compress and expand during spaceflight, according to a University of Michigan study. The findings could have applications for treating other health conditions that affect brain function, says principal investigator Rachael Seidler, U-M professor of kinesiology and psychology.

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27

May'16

The Fantastic Plastic Brain

It’s one of the most extraordinary discoveries of the 20th century. Named neuroplasticity, it’s the finding that the brain can change, new brain cells are constantly being born and die, new connections can form and that the internal structure of the existing synapses can change...

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10

Oct'15

The Brain Is Plastic. And That Is Good News

Your son may be dyslexic, your daughter may have ADHD. Until quite recently these problems were regarded as devastating, but fortunately this is no longer the case. Today we know that the human brain is plastic — that it can change. And that is good news for your children.

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24

Oct'12

Neuroplasticity: An Extraordinary Discovery of the Twentieth Century

In the past few years neurologists have dismantled, piece by piece, the entrenched view that the human brain is fixed and unchanging in adults. It was long believed that once we grow up, our brains have a set number of neurons performing functions in a fixed way.

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29

Jan'01

Juggle for a Bigger Brain

It's no longer just a party trick. Juggling, and probably other visual skills that take time to master, increase the size of your brain. That’s the conclusion of German researchers, which throws down the gauntlet to the mainstream view that the size of the adult brain does not change at all except when it is confronted by ageing or disease.

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