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Reading, Maths and Learning

23

Dec'16

What Causes Reading Disabilities?

Successful intervention is dependent on finding the cause or causes of a problem. Most problems can only be solved if one knows their causes. A viable point of departure would therefore be to ask the question, "What causes reading disabilities?"

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05

Dec'16

Fun Ways to Make Your Kids Smarter Over the December Holidays

The December holidays can be a wonderful time to regroup after a tough year, although a nagging concern for parents may be the fear that their children’s hard work over the academic year may regress during their well-deserved break...

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02

Dec'16

The Right to Read, Chapter 6: At the Crossroads

"The Right to Read" is no longer for sale, but Part One of this book can now be read online!... It has always been typical of the human being that he wants an explanation for most phenomena he encounters. Having an explanation greatly contributes to his sense of security. This desire is so great that, if he comes across a phenomenon for which he cannot find a reasonable and a rational explanation, he will fabricate one himself.

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30

Nov'16

The Right to Read, Chapter 5: Intervention

"The Right to Read" is no longer for sale, but Part One of this book can now be read online!... Soon after the “discovery” of learning disabilities in the 1960s, remedial programs of different types were under way, ranging from small one-enthusiastic-teacher size programs to large, nationally funded ones. However, a disappointing shock came to many special educators in the U.S.A. when the President's Report to Congress, reported by Nixon in 1970 in American Education, stated its findings.

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30

Nov'16

The Right to Read, Chapter 4: LD or not LD?

"The Right to Read" is no longer for sale, but Part One of this book can now be read online!... One could probably fill a vast library if one would put together all the research studies that attempted to prove that a learning disability is caused by either a neurological dysfunction, or that it is a genetically transferred disorder.

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24

Nov'16

The Right to Read, Chapter 3: Brains, Genes and Education

"The Right to Read" is no longer for sale, but Part One of this book can now be read online!... One could probably fill a vast library if one would put together all the research studies that attempted to prove that a learning disability is caused by either a neurological dysfunction, or that it is a genetically transferred disorder.

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22

Nov'16

Help for Handwriting Problems

A handwriting problem exists when a learner writes illegibly or extremely slowly. Everyone occasionally produces some illegible letters, but some learners do so frequently enough that understanding what they have written is difficult; at this point, the difficulty would be considered a problem. Learn more about the causes and how a handwriting problem can be overcome.

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20

Nov'16

The Right to Read, Chapter 2: Birth of a Syndrome

"The Right to Read" is no longer for sale, but Part One of this book can now be read online!... On Saturday, April 6, 1963, a new disease was invented in Chicago, Illinois, that over the next twenty years would slowly begin to infect millions of schoolchildren nationwide. This was no simple virus or common bacteria. Hidden deep within the neurological system, it resisted detection by medical personnel, evaded clear diagnosis through testing, and had no discernible cure...

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20

Nov'16

Spelling Mnemonics: Helpful But Not a Solution

A mnemonic is a specific reconstruction of target content intended to tie new information more closely to the learner's existing knowledge base and, therefore, facilitate retrieval. Spelling mnemonics is intended to help us remember the spelling of words. In order to remember that the word “cemetery” is spelled with three e's, for example, one can picture a lady screaming 'E-E-E' as she walks past the cemetery...

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13

Nov'16

The Right to Read, Chapter 1: The Keys to the Kingdom

"The Right to Read" is no longer for sale, but Part One of this book can now be read online!... The term dyslexia was introduced in 1884 by the German ophthalmologist, R. Berlin. He coined it from the Greek words dys meaning ill or difficult and lexis meaning word, and used it to describe a specific disturbance of reading in the absence of pathological conditions in the visual organs.2 In a later publication, in 1887, Berlin stated that dyslexia, “presuming right handedness,” is caused by a left-sided cerebral lesion...

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